Pandora’s Lunchbox (Catchy Title!)

This is a MUST READ, especially for anyone who controls a lunchbox – for yourself or a spouse or a kid (I find processed foods wind up there first).pandora-bc2

By the way, this is the sort of thing you’ll get notified about first if you “Like” my Facebook Page – see that little box on the right over there? Go click it!

Grist

You’ve heard of pink slime. You know trans fats are cardiovascular atrocities. You’re well aware that store-bought orange juice is essentially a scam. But, no matter how great of a processed-food sleuth you are, chances are you’ve never set food inside a processing plant to see how many of these products are actually made.

Writer Melanie Warner, whose new exposé-on-the-world-of-processed-foods book, Pandora’s Lunchbox, is out this week, spent the past year and a half doing exactly that. In her quest to explore the murky and convoluted world of soybean oil, milk protein concentrates (a key ingredient in processed cheese), and petroleum-based artificial dyes, she spoke to food scientists, uncovered disturbing regulatory loopholes in food law, and learned just how little we know about many of the food products on supermarket shelves.

After reading Pandora’s Lunchbox, I sent Melanie some burning questions via email. Here is what she…

View original post 1,051 more words

Join us on Facebook!

I’ve recently added a Facebook page for FoodiEvangelist, and I invite you all to come “Like” it.

I’ve just created a photo album of some of our recent family dinners, with recipes! It’s been a fun project, recording our meals, so I plan to keep adding to it. I know we all need help coming up with ideas and it’s really good if somebody else does the initial recipe testing!

Come on over and check it out!

UPDATE: You need to click the link above or go to https://www.facebook.com/FoodiEvangelist and “Like” THAT page. Just “liking” this post will not affect Facebook, you’re just liking it on WordPress. So click the link, “Like” the FB page, and then you can see the photos and all the other fun FB stuff.

And I’ll likely be posting there a lot more often than here, so definitely get over there if you want to follow me.

The American Way of Eating: My Favorite Quotes

Let me be perfectly honest up front and say I’m about to quote liberally from Tracie McMillan’s The American Way of Eating. I quote her for two reasons: first, to show you her excellent writing so that you’ll hopefully go read the book; and second, because I absolutely just LOVE the points she is making here (note that I put her italicized words in all caps since wordpress italicizes everything in a box quote).

Box meals don’t save us time any more than going out to eat does, and they don’t even save us money. What they do instead is remove the need to have to come up with a plan for dinner, something that’s easy when you’re a skilled cook–and bafflingly difficult when you’re not. The real convenience behind these convenience foods isn’t time or money, but that they remove one more bit of stress from our day….

The key to getting people to eat better isn’t that they should spend more money, or even that they should spend more time. It’s making the actual cooking of a meal into an EASY choice, the obvious answer. And that only happens when people are as comfortable and confident in the kitchen as they are taking care of the other endless chores that come with running a modern family–paying bills, cleaning house, washing the car. It only happens, in other words, when we can cook well. It doesn’t take advanced culinary acumen to know that making a pasta-and-ground beef one-skillet dinner from scratch isn’t actually any more difficult than using a box, but it does take education and training. Enough, at least, to convey that grilling a steak and steaming vegetables is just a basic household task….

There will be days for every person, every family, where it IS worth paying four times more for the service. That’s fine. But the longer I’m at Applebee’s, the more I think everyone should be making that choice from equal footing: with easy access to fresh ingredients, and a solid ability to cook. (pp. 212-213)

 

…the healthiest route through the American foodscape is a steep and arduous path most easily ascended by joining its top income bracket. So far as I can tell, changing what’s on our plates simply isn’t feasible without changing far more. Wages, health care, work hours, and kitchen literacy are just as critical to changing our diets as the agriculture we practice or the places at which we shop. (231)

 

It’s worthwhile, of course, to talk about food as a meal or as the product of a farm, but to engage with our meals solely on those terms is to ignore food’s core essence. Food is not a luxury lifestyle product. It is a social good.

 

AMEN sister!!